Friday, September 11, 2015

117

image frompublic domain



PROCESS SURREAL
He’s the madman, slicing off an ear,
Spoiling his metaphor,
Charts a sentence through the valley
Of amore
Flays arms and heart in rhythmic stupor
And for what?
The juxtaposition of a simile perfect;
All’s for nought, and nought but dread,
This creature like Andromeda chained,
Not to jagged rock, or torture pole,
Bounded though, to inertia where,
Gravity tells no tale orated to,
The weightlessness of words.

Written for
Words Count with Mama Zen
Imaginary Garden With Real Toads
from the inspiration of Jean Cocteau's first film The Blood of a Poet (1930) to write a poem in less than 80 words

15 comments:

  1. Guess I have the honor of being #!. You certainly captured the surrealistic spirit of the prompt clip, pulling us along over a verbose landscape of macabre verbiage & denizens of crying angel statues (DOCTOR WHO reference). I like the lines /charts a sentence through the valley/of amore/. Writing can be all things, but it may never constitute no-thing.

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    1. Thanks for your appreciation Glen

      Much love...

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  2. The weight of weightlessness.. Only madmen and poets would know I think,

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    1. For sure Bjorn, for sure

      Much love...

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    2. Really cool, Gillena. I like the Van Gogh reference.

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    3. Happy you dropped in to read mine Zen

      much love...

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  3. Words are weightless, to a degree, but can deliver a powerful blow, as this poem shows.

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    1. Thank you for your appreciation Kerry

      much love...

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  4. I love the way you open with the ear...I thought about Picasso, too and I like how you don't mention his name. Nice work, Gillena!

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    1. Thank you for your appreciation Hannah

      Much love...

      Delete
  5. You've capture surreal perfectly. "Charts a sentence through the valley of amore" Love that line!

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    1. Thanks for dropping in to read mine Susie

      Much love...

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  6. 'and for what' - the eternal question of poets, yes? ~

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    1. Thanks for dropping in to read mine Grapeling

      Much love...

      Delete
  7. Oh I love this πŸ’› especially 'Flays arms and heart in rhythmic stupor. And for what? The juxtaposition of a simile perfect' πŸ’›

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